Breeder’s Cup Delays Paying Winners, Investigating Results

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The Breeders’ Cup has run into some controversy with its yearly Breeders’ Cup Betting Challenge. The controversy has actually caused the organisers to delay paying the inner. The whole situation has been caused by numerous players accusing the winner of collaborating with at least one other player, in a way that violates the rules of horse racing.

Breeders' Cup to investigate collusion claims

The Breeders’ Cup has said it will investigate claims of collusion. The winner of the Betting Challenge will not be paid out until the investigation is complete.

Breeders’ Cup Annual Betting Challenge

Every year the Breeders’ Cup runs the Breeders’ Cup Betting Challenge (BCBC). This has become the world’s largest live-money handicapping tournament. The 2017 tournament attracted over 400 players. Each player had to pay $10 000 (CA$12 700) to enter the tournament. Out of this money, players would use CA$9500 for betting on the races, while the remaining CA$3170 would go to the prize pool for the competition.

Each player taking part in the BCBC is required to place at least CA$760 in wagers on five races on Friday’s running. They then need to male at least CA$1100 in bets on Saturday, spread over five races. Players do have the opportunity to skip betting on the required number of races. However, this will then hurt their final score in the tournament.

Breeders’ Cup to Investigate Before Paying

The winner of the tournament was Nisan Gabbay. But, since his win, numerous players have written to the Breeders’ Cup and complained about irregularities. Other players have suggested that Gabbay colluded with another player in the tournament, which is against the rules. According to the complaints, Gabbay never placed any bets on Saturday until his long-time partner Kevin McFarland’s bankroll had drooped down to $1.

Gabbay went on to make several large bets on the final few races of the day. These large bets saw him increase his bankroll to CA$223 000 and give him the win in the tournament. Many are suggesting that Gabbay had purposely tried to avoid competing against McFarland, as McFarland stood to get a CA$1.2 million bonus if he won the tournament.

Both players have dismissed accusations. However, the Breeders’ Cup has said they will investigate claims before paying out the winners.